Changes between Version 3 and Version 4 of DoeTAppliedToGameDesign

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bhook (IP: 64.207.62.170)
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05/17/06 22:44:20 (13 years ago)
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  • DoeTAppliedToGameDesign

    v3 v4  
    229/26/04 
    33 
    4 Don Norman's book The Design of Everyday Things is the definitive masterpiece on industrial/consumer design for the layman.  It cleanly and neatly broaches the subject of intuitive, sensible design without being overly academic.  Readers finish the book with an a-ha! feeling of insight into the problems that designers of all types must solve, yet often don't (his example of the transition away from the effective but staid Bell telephone to the many stylish but eminently unusable phones of today is illuminating). 
     4Don Norman's book __The Design of Everyday Things__ is the definitive masterpiece on industrial/consumer design for the layman.  It cleanly and neatly broaches the subject of intuitive, sensible design without being overly academic.  Readers finish the book with an a-ha! feeling of insight into the problems that designers of all types must solve, yet often don't (his example of the transition away from the effective but staid Bell telephone to the many stylish but eminently unusable phones of today is illuminating). 
    55 
    66Needless to say, I highly recommend The Design of Everyday Things and its sister book, Emotional Design, even if you're not a designer -- the books are simply fascinating in and of themselves.  But if you're a game designer, the bulk of the principles detailed in his book map directly to the problems of game design, particularly in the area of player interaction and involvement. 
    4545Some game designers have done something similar in an attempt to challenge the player.  Older adventure games violated the principles of visibility (making the player "find the magic pixel" or phrase a sentence just so), mapping (requiring the random combination of unrelated in-game objects), and constraints (performing some otherwise valid action would result in instant death).   
    4646 
    47 Deliberately removing ease of use is often considered a cornerstone of game design -- it introduces challenge, obviously, since what might have been trivial is now arduous.  However, right now I'm not convinced that this is solid game design.  You can make a game easy to play but still very difficult to master without purposefully irritating the player.  "Learning by death" is poor game design -- if a wall is going to kill a player just by touching it, make it rather obvious so the player can skip the necessary but aggravating "Hey, what's this wall d-*** RELOAD ***" sequence. 
     47Deliberately removing ease of use is often considered a cornerstone of game design -- it introduces challenge, obviously, since what might have been trivial is now arduous.  However, right now I'm not convinced that this is solid game design.  You can make a game easy to play but still very difficult to master without purposefully irritating the player.  "Learning by death" is poor game design -- if a wall is going to kill a player just by touching it, make it rather obvious so the player can skip the necessary but aggravating "Hey, what's this wall d-{{{*** RELOAD ***"}}} sequence. 
    4848 
    4949Implementing Norman's design principles won't guarantee that a game is interesting or fun, but they will at least make it consistent, logical, and easy to play, which is a good first step.